Urban Farming News

Does Monsanto Help Farmers?

Posted in climate stabilization, distribution, farm labor, food security, fossil fuels, global hunger, Uncategorized by Urban Farming News on January 22, 2010

So, with all of this buzz going on around Monsanto this week, I decided to look a bit deeper into this big, bad company.

What is the cost of a GMO?

A farmer’s livelihood? The inability to stop cross  pollination? Increased food production on less land? Eradicating Hunger?

This is a topic that hits close to home for me.  Raised in rural Wisconsin, My family represents a strong hold of small family farmers. I will admit, I was shocked to learn that our family uses GMO’s such as “Round Up Ready”  soy beans (if you’re wondering,  Court Rules For Monsanto, Anti Trust Case Remains reported by NPR) However if you look at the facts, Monsanto does defend small farms around the world.

Farm Facts According to Monsanto

* Today’s farmer feeds an average of 155 people, compared to only 26 people in 1960

* Farmers are a direct lifeline to more than 24 million jobs in the U.S.

* To keep up with population growth more food will have to be produced in the next 50 years as the past 10,000 years combined.

* Go to Monsanto to read more!

Conservation & Security

Clearly we need to keep our farms producing at largest capacity  with high quality.  Many families depend on their crops and need income security. Conservation of natural resources is also a serious concern for farmers. Check out this nifty video, Conserve More featuring Dr. Klaus Ammann

In summery, the video highlights how Monsanto’s engineered seeds reduce the need to till the land, thus reducing fuel cost for equipment. In addition, water is conserved as a natural erosion barrier is maintained. Basically, GMO crops = decreased tractor use + erosion control.  This equation seems a bit too simple…

Eradicating Hunger

The highlight of Monsanto’s lovely website was the bit that stated “True or False: The world grows enough food to feed its population. Generally true, although to eradicate hunger, people in the developing world need to be able to access food either by growing it or through purchase, which means it needs to be affordable”

The “developing world” is a loose term. The United States is still developing, if you want my humble opinion. I hope I can one day tell stories of people being hungry, with out jobs and homes (wait a second…didn’t I hear those as a kid?)

What will it take to really end hunger?   Let’s make like a farmer, roll up our sleeves, work our butts off and find out!

Growing Home Community Garden

Posted in community development, distribution, food security, hunger, local food by Urban Farming News on January 20, 2010

Part of my role as an outreach coordinator is to get knee deep in the thriving San Francisco urban gardening society. A project that I am particularly in awe of is the Growing Home Community Garden. This garden is part of Project Homeless Connect (PHC).

History of PHC: Since October 2004 over 21,936 volunteers have provided services to over 31,000 homeless and poor San Franciscans. I was honestly floored when I showed up to volunteer at the most recent PHC in December.

Growing Home Community Garden: Rallies city departments, the Hayes Valley Neighborhood association, and community members from far and wide. The mission: ‘to provide a community garden where homeless and housed San Franciscans work side-by-side to grow nutritious food, access green space and build community.” When I first spoke with Celina, the garden coordinator I could feel the good vibes (not to mention, any group that can get a bob cat and hydraulic arm to break up asphalt has got it’s sh*t together).

I have now volunteered twice at this amazing community project. Day One: Removing asphalt – what a great way to meet the garden directors, planners and core volunteers. Day Two: building the wooden garden boxes. It was truly a puzzle of team-work, where skilled carpenters and novice nail gun users united.

“This town [San Francisco] has a lot of heart,” gushed Judith, PHC executive director. That was a sunny December afternoon, in the past month I have begun to learn to true meaning of those words.  I am thrilled to help these truly dedicated individuals. In conclusion: take a page out of this book, get up, get out and grow.

Food Files: Taja Sevelle on Urban Farming to Fight Hunger

Check Out This Fantastic Article about Urban Farming’s Founder!

Food Files: Taja Sevelle on Urban Farming to Fight Hunger

by Katherine Gustafson